What evidence can I use in a car accident claim where no police report was made?


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Question:

What evidence can I use in a car accident claim where no police report was made?

Answer:

Usually in most car accident claims, there is a police report taken shortly after the accident which can be used when making an accident claim. However, a car accident with the police not involved also happens, in which case there is no police report that can be used when making a car accident claim with the insurance company. In cases such as these, there are still other forms of evidence that can be used to support the car accident claim.

In order to obtain compensation for pain and suffering due to injuries and damages incurred to property during a car accident, there must be adequate evidence to prove fault and damages. If there is no police report, the following are forms of evidence that can still be submitted with a car accident claim:

  • A medical report from the doctor who attended the victim is extremely essential in a car accident claim. It proves that the injuries the victim incurred were the result of the accident, and also assists in evaluating the amount of compensation the victim might expect from the injuries suffered. Therefore, it is paramount that a person sees a doctor immediately following an accident so he can have his injuries assessed as well as receive necessary treatment.
  • Pictures taken at the accident scene are considered material evidence that supports an accident claim. Cameras on cell phones are indispensable and should be used at the accident scene, particularly of the areas of damage to the car and the position the vehicles ended up in at the conclusion of the collision.
  • Witness statements are also invaluable. Those who saw the accident and claim that you were the victim to the accident (not the one at fault), can give substance to your accident claim and help in ensuring that you will be awarded damages.
  • Personal information the victim can supply is also admissible evidence. If you are the victim, you should write down details of the accident as you remember them. That should include the date and time the accident occurred, the road conditions, weather conditions and other details. Any other evidence that involves a third party, the defendant's inebriated condition, or other details and documentation that supports it can be used.
  • If the victim missed work due to injuries caused by the accident, he can submit an affidavit from his employer as evidence.

This site does not provide legal advice and users of this site should not interpret any of the information presented here as legal advice. The information provided merely conveys general information related to commonly asked legal questions. We are not a law firm and the employees responding to questions are not acting as your legal attorney. You should ultimately consult with a lawyer for your case.

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